Hamburg, a feast for fashionista

Hamburg, a feast for fashionista

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Hamburg, the largest city in Germany after Berlin, lies at the head of the long funnel-shaped estuary of the River Elbe. The city is best known for its famous harbor area, the Port of Hamburg. In addition to being a major transportation hub, Hamburg has become one of Europe’s most important cultural and commercial centers, as well as a major tourist destination. If you are a person who never gets tired even after 24 hours of continousshopping then this is the correct place for you.
Kunsthalle Hamburg:
In three separate but connected buildings on the Glockengießerwall, Kunsthalle Hamburg is one of Germany’s top art galleries. Highlights include numerous altarpieces, works by local artists of the 14th century, and Dutch masters of the 16th and 17th centuries. Also of note are its fine collections of 19th-century German and French paintings, plus substantial modern and contemporary art collections. Tours and fun programs for children are available.
Tierpark Hagenbeck:
In Hamburg’s northwestern suburb of Stellingen, Tierpark Hagenbeck, the city’s zoo, was established in 1907 to house a collection of exotic animals owned by a local fishmonger, Carl Hagenbeck. The zoo is still run by his descendants. This excellent facility was the first in the world to use open enclosures surrounded by ditches as opposed to cages, increasing the free-range area of the animals. It was also the first zoo to group animals by species, ideas that inspired the owners of other zoo parks to adopt. Another family attraction is Planetarium Hamburg, located in an old water tower.
Jenisch Haus:
Not far from the New Elbe Tunnel, in the Klein Flottbek district of Hamburg, lies the beautiful Jenischpark, one of the city’s largest and most rural open spaces. Here, you’ll find the superb Neoclassical 19th-century Jenisch-Haus, with its rooms reflecting the taste of the prosperous middle classes in styles ranging from Louis XVI to Art Nouveau, all preserved in the on-site museum, a branch of the Altona Museum. The park is also home to the Ernst-Barlach-Haus, with its collections of sculptures, drawings, and printed graphic art.
Shopping district:
Germany’s wealthiest city offers many shopping opportunities from worldwide names to local boutiques. In the city center you will find typical shopping malls and stores. The most popular street for shopping is just south of the Inner Alster Lake. Wander away from the tourist district to find more unique locally owned shops. Outdoor activities such as boat tours feature heavily in most people’s itineraries, but there are plenty of indoor attractions for a rainy day.
Traditional taste:
This traditional fish dish is named after a district of Hamburg that was once a fishing village. Plaice (scholle) is baked or pan-fried with bacon, onions and shrimp from the North Sea. Plaice is one of the most commonly eaten fishes in Northern Germany, and used to be the key ingredient in fish and chips

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