Iceland, unleash the Isle’s veil

Iceland, unleash the Isle’s veil

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Whale Watching, Reykjavik:
No matter when you plan to travel, whale watching happens year round, although summer is the most popular time to see these gentle giants. During the warmer months, trips run day and night, including whale watching in the midnight sun. Tour operators say there’s an 80-95% chance of seeing these magnificent creatures, depending on the time of year. Best of all, surfacing often happens right near the boats, so you may well enjoy a ringside seat for one of nature’s most awe-inspiring spectacles.
Spectacular Geysers:
An easy 50-minute drive from Reykjavik, Strokkur Geysir is the most popular fountain geyser in the country. This highly active hot spring area lies in the southwest of Iceland. Boiling mud pits and around 100 other smaller exploding geysers are waiting to be explored here. Every few minutes, Strokkur shoots water 30 meters into the air. A memorable experience is digging up Geysir or “hot spring” bread, rye bread that has been baking underground for 24 hours.
Skaftafell Ice Cave:
In the south of the country, Vatnajökull National Park is a land of glaciers and magnificent ice caves, which attract adventurers from across the globe. You’ll find a number of visitor centers, those in Skaftafell Ice Cave and Höfn are open year round, while Skriðuklaustur and Jökulsárgljúfur are closed in winter. The best time to visit Skaftafell Ice Cave is during winter after heavy rain has washed the top layer of the glacier away. If seen at the right time, the cave is bathed in spectacular blue light.
Kirkjufell Mountain:
Grundarfjördur, a charming fishing village centrally is located on the north coast of Snaefellsnes peninsula. The town lies in a picturesque fjord, surrounded by mountains, with Mt. Kirkjufell looming as a striking landmark. Dotted about the surroundings, you’ll discover small streams and waterfalls. During winter, Kirkjufell is a great place to watch the awe-inspiring Northern Lights. Eyrbyggja Heritage Centre holds exhibitions on Grundarfjördur’s seafaring history and is the information center for the whole peninsula.
Traditional taste:
It is great with butter, smoked salmon mutton pâté, hangikjöt (smoked lamb), or with pickled herring or cheese. Icelanders often eat this bread as a side dish with the Icelandic fish dish, plokkfiskur. You can buy this bread in most grocery stores in Iceland.

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