Karachi, cacophony of colours!

Karachi, cacophony of colours!

Karachi, cacophony of colours!

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Karachi, which was once the prehistoric humble abode of Sindhi fishermen, is now a roaring urban economy that sustains the country with its large seaports. Always up and running, the streets of Karachi are a cacophony of colourful buses, impatient people and the infectious energy of its daily hustle.

Mazaar-E-Quaid

Also known as National Mausoleum. It is the resting Place of the Founder of Pakistan Mohammad Ali Jinnah. This tomb is among the most popular destinations for the foreigners as well as the locals. The tomb usually remains calm and peaceful. It was designed by a great architect Yahya Merchant and built with white marbles.

Turtle Beach

Another one for the adventure-lovers. Located between hawksbay and sandspit, Turtle beach is a breathtaking attraction that offers some quiet from the city once more. Green sea turtles lay their eggs at this beach, which means if you travel in the right season (summer time), you just might get lucky enough to see them hatch and fight their way to the sea.

Pakistan Maritime Museum

This navel museum is among the city’s best attractions as it gives visitors a chance to see a real submarine, along with several aircrafts and different artillery of the yesteryears that were used by the Pakistan Navy. There is also a six-gallery indoor museum that educates visitors through murals, relief sculptures and dioramas.

Churna Island and its water sports:

If you love all things sea, then Churna Island, which is only a two-hour drive away from central Karachi, is a must-visit. Here is where you can swim, snorkel and scuba dive around the island’s reef and gaze at a multitude of sea creatures, from fish to snakes and turtles that inhabit its warm waters.

Empress Market

The Empress Market is a colourful but chaotic market that sells everything and anything. It’s a cool attraction to visit early in the morning to avoid rush hour. All imaginable groceries, live animals and pets, textiles, stationery and many other things can be bought in the foyers and interiors of this colonial-era structure. The building is named after the then Empress of India, Queen Victoria.

Ranjini Trinitymirror

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