Lithesome Lesotho!

Lesotho, a high-altitude, landlocked kingdom encircled by South Africa, is crisscrossed by a network of rivers and mountain ranges including the 3,482m-high peak of Thabana Ntlenyana. On the Thaba Bosiu plateau, near Lesotho’s capital, Maseru, are ruins dating from the 19th-century reign of King Moshoeshoe I. Thaba Bosiu overlooks iconic Mount Qiloane, an enduring symbol of the nation’s Basotho people.

Tsehlanyane National Park

The undisputed jewel in the crown of Lesotho’s national park system comes in the form of the sun-baked highlands of Tsehlanyane.Surrounded by the rock-ribbed peaks of the mighty Maloti Mountainsthe region is famed for its rare woodland habitats and high altitudes of up to 5,600 meters above sea level.Trekkers often opt to hit the connecting trail that links the park with Bokong, and come to delve into the wildernesses of chi chi trees and rare fern species, endemic berg bamboo groves and mountain animals that abounds in all its glory here.

Sani Pass and the Highest pub in Africa

Amazingly popular with locals and tourists alike, The Sani Pass is a remarkable area for driving, hiking or mountain biking while enjoying sprawling views of the Drakensburg Mountains. This spectacular 4×4 track twists and snakes its way through the “Ukhahlamba Drakensberg Park” up into the impenetrable rocky cliffs of Lesotho’s Roof of Africa circuit that links the spectacular scenery of the Drakensberg with the attractions of Northern Lesotho.

Semonkong

Nestled between the dusty escarpments of the Maseru District, close to the geographical heart of Lesotho as a whole, the little conglomeration of bamboo-topped thatch villages and huts that is Semonkong might not look like one of the most-visited spots in the country; but it is. Why? Well, that honour surely has to go to the mist-producing plumes of the great Maletsunyane Falls, which can be found roaring over the edge of a table-top mountain nearby.

Kome Cave Dwellings

Away from anyone’s view, including that of warring tribes and the primeval cannibals that came to maraud Lesotho due to hunger in the early 19th century, is a remarkable village where cave dwellings have been carved and built under towering sandstone rocks. Almost two centuries later, these caves are still home to descendants of the original inhabitants (Basia and Bataung clans). There are also faded san paintings in the cave which indicates that the san people also occupied the cave.

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