May to quit in June, Brexit talk fails

May to quit in June,  Brexit talk fails

May to quit in June, Brexit talk fails

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London, May 18:
A day after British Prime Minister Theresa May was forced to set a June timeline for her exit from Downing Street, the Opposition Labour Party ended the cross-party Brexit talks on Friday without arriving at any agreement.
Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn wrote to May to declare an end to the process, blaming the “weakness and instability” of her government as a leadership contest gets underway within the ruling Conservative Party.
“The increasing weakness and instability of your government means there cannot be confidence in securing whatever might be agreed between us,” Corbyn wrote.
“As you have been setting out your decision to stand down and Cabinet ministers are competing to succeed you, the position of the government has become ever more unstable and its authority eroded,” he noted.
Britain’s Opposition Labour Party ended the crucial cross-party Brexit talks with embattled Prime Minister Theresa May on Friday without a deal, saying negotiations have “gone as far as they can”.
Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn wrote to May to declare an end to the negotiation process, blaming the “weakness and instability” of her government as a leadership contest gets underway within the ruling Conservative Party.
May in turn blamed Labour for not having a “common position” within its own ranks on issues such as a second referendum. Britain’s exit from the 28-member European Union had been due to take place on March 29 – but after MPs voted down the deal May had negotiated with the bloc three times, the EU gave the UK an extension until October 31.
“I should reiterate that, without significant changes, we will continue to oppose the government’s deal as we do not believe it safeguards jobs, living standards and manufacturing industry in Britain,” Corbyn said.
The compromise talks were convened around six weeks ago, when May lost the third vote in Parliament on her EU Withdrawal Agreement rejected repeatedly by MPs over the controversial Irish backstop clause.
The latest Labour stance means May’s deal looks even more unlikely to secure the parliamentary arithmetic required for the Withdrawal Agreement to be enforced in time for the new October 31 Brexit deadline.

Prem Trinitymirror

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