Zambia, Africa’s captivating wildlife

Zambia, Africa’s captivating wildlife

Zambia, Africa’s captivating wildlife

The rewards of travelling in Zambia are those of exploring remote, mesmerising wilderness as full of an astonishing diversity of wildlife as any part of Southern Africa. Adventures undertaken here will lead you deep into the bush where animals, both predators and prey, wander through unfenced camps, where night-time means swapping stories around the fire and where the human footprint is nowhere to be seen. Where one day you can canoe down a wide, placid river and the next raft through the raging rapids near world-famous Victoria Falls.
Siavonga:
Cascading down to the banks of Lake Kariba in a patchwork of acacia trees, palms, rosewoods and forest figs, the verdant town of Siavonga has established itself as one of the premier holidaying spots in all of Zambia.
It’s peppered with excellent hotels that boast sunning terraces and cafes overlooking the water, while boats bob along the shoreline and the hills of the Zambezi Valley erupt all across the horizon.On this – the largest reservoir in the world – it’s possible to enjoy oodles of watersports and recreational activities, while Siavonga itself is fringed by pretty beaches and walking trails.
Mosi-oa-Tunya National Park:
The legendary ‘Smoke which Thunders’, Mosi-oa-Tunya is home to some of the most striking and unforgettable sections of the Victoria Falls.As the second-largest single cataract on the globe, it’s easy to see why that part of Zambia’s mighty river has garnered itself a UNESCO heritage tag.
And when you add in the populations of white rhinos, Angolan giraffes, zebras and the occasional elephant that also tread this way, it’s even easier to see why quite so many visitors flock to this corner of the country every year. You’ll need good walking boots and a daring disposition at hand, ready for the narrow platforms of the so-called Knife-Edge Bridge that arches over the falls themselves!
Lower Zambezi National Park:
One of Zambia’s more off-the-beaten-track wildernesses lies between the borders of the Lower Zambezi National Park; a place yet untouched by the onslaught of mass safari going and ecotourism.
A patchwork of muddy banks and miombo gallery woods, the 4,000-square-kilometer area is known for its vast floodplain.
This seasonal wetland magnetizes groups of lions and elephants, buffalo and leopard, which all congregate here to water and feed. Lower Zambezi can’t be reached by paved road, so a 4X4 or a chartered flight connection (a great way to survey the wilds of southern Zambia) is entirely necessary.
Traditional taste:
Zambia’s staple food is maize. Nshima makes up the main component of Zambian meals and is made from pounded white maize. It is served with “relish,” stew and vegetables and eaten by hand Nshima is eaten during lunch and dinner.

Ranjini Trinitymirror

leave a comment