Odessa, Ukraine’s opera house

Odessa, Ukraine’s opera house

Odessa, Ukraine’s opera house

A Black Sea port city, Odessa is known for its beaches and 19th-century architecture. Today, it has a thoroughly contemporary energy that complements the historic grandeur. Why come to Odessa? To visit its unusual museums in the morning, to have a relaxing rest by the sea during the daytime, and to experience the wildest party in your entire life in the Ukrainian Ibiza at night.
Odessa Opera House:
Locals appreciate the culture of going out and consider a visit to such a venue to be an important cultural event. Ukrainians are more than familiar with Russian musicians like Tchaikovsky and Stravinsky, so Ukraine is the perfect place to get acquainted with their masterpieces for an extremely affordable price, starting from 50 UAH (US$2). A magical atmosphere reigns inside and outside the theatre. The 19th-century building of the Odessa National Opera and Ballet Theatre is influenced by French and Italian Baroque styles.
Catacombs:
Underneath Odessa lies a huge network of tunnels known as the Odessa Catacombs. They are a big part of the city’s history, having been a refuge for Soviet Partisans during World War II and later smugglers. Nowadays, there is a small museum on the Partisan movement, the Museum of Partisan Glory, and you can explore the tunnels on organized tours into the undergrounds of Odessa. It is easy to get lost there, so do not attempt to visit these tunnels on your own or with an unregistered guide.
Lanzheron beach:
Vorontsov Palace is an architectural jewel of Odessa. The palace was built in 1827 in a mixture of different architectural styles, but at the same time gives the impression of lightness and elegance. The palace was built on the site of a Turkish fortress and later was the residence of the Russian statesman and military leader, the Governor-General of Mikhail Vorontsov. Nowadays, it is an art centre and a hub for the youth cultural events.
Traditional taste:
Freshly made dumplings called varenyky are a common Ukrainian staple. Varenyky is dough stuffed with a variety of foods, such as potatoes, meats, cheeses, sauerkraut, and even fruit, such as blueberries or cherries, for dessert. … Meats, such as kovbasa (sausage), poultry, and pork are important to the Ukrainian diet.

Ranjini Trinitymirror

leave a comment